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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 70 (some duplicates have been removed)
're watching al-jazeera live from london. also coming up on the program -- thousands rally in tunisia in support of the government and against the the prime minister's plan to dissolve it. the search goes on but there's no trace of the meteorite that left a trail of destruction across central russia and the winner is, we'll be live from the berlin film festival with news of who's got the golden bear. thank you for joining us. a bomb targeting people shopping for vegetables has once again highlighted pakistan's deep sectarian tension. at least 60 have been killed in an explosion in the southwestern city of quetta. more than 200 were injured when a bomb exploded outside a market. police say it was aimed at the region's minority shia population. attacks in quetta have killed more than 200 in the past month. we have the latest from islamabad. what more do we know about this attack? >> hi, barbara. what we know is that this bomb, which went off in this market was very powerful bomb. it was an improvised explosive device
in tunisia; fleeing the violence in syria and delaying a decision on gay scouts. but first, with the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: a new round of fighting broke out today in damascus, syria-- the heaviest in weeks. rebel fighters made a thrust toward the central part of the capital, and smoke rose over the city as government forces fought back with artillery. they're trying to hold the core of the city, the main stronghold for president bashar al-assad. in northern mali, french ground troops battled islamist rebels overnight, outside the city of gao. it was new evidence that while the french have retaken key cities, the insurgents have not yet been routed from the countryside. meanwhile, french and malian soldiers found caches of industrial-strength explosives and makeshift bomb labs. the rebels had hidden them outside gao. u.s. investigators said today they are not ready to rule that lithium ion batteries used in boeing's 787 dreamliners are inherently unsafe for aviation. instead, the national transportation safety board said manufacturers need to build
stories from the middle east. margaret warner gets the latest from tunisia, the birthplace of the arab spring, where a leading opposition figure was assassinated today. >> brown: and ray suarez reports on the plight of syrian refugees who've fled to lebanon. >> at this tent camp in al-marj, in the eastern part of lebanon's bekaa valley-- only 25 miles from the syrian border-- refugees are struggling to adapt to a new, impermanent reality. >> ifill: and we close with a look at what's happening with the boy scouts, as they struggle to decide whether to lift a long-standing ban on openly gay members. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the u.s. postal service announced today it plans to end saturday mail delivery beginning in august. under the plan, post offices already open on saturdays will remain so. packages will also continue to be delivered on satu
in the next half hour -- them of political unrest in tunisia after a leading secular politician is assassinated in front of his home. >> the german education minister is stripped of her document for playing it -- her doctorate for plagiarism, and the opposition calls for her resignation. >> the political crisis in tunisian deepened dramatically tonight following the assassination of a top opposition leader and the violent unrest that has followed in the wake of his killing. troops have been deployed in a number of locations to restore order. >> the killing of the prominent secular politician has sparked protests across the country. supporters flooded the streets of tunis and other cities. there are reports of barricades being erected in clashes with police. >> news of the assassination sparked protests in several tunisian cities. in the capital, thousands of angry protesters followed the ambulance carrying belaid's body. many blame the islamists, an accusation the party denies. >> people know that the criminals are directly linked to the head of the party. >> all these islamist
week one of the men who helped bring rule to an end in tunisia was assassinated and france continues operations against al-qaeda and extremists in nearby mali. in egypt, there's growing opposition to president mohammed morsi and his muslim brotherhood. in syria the civil war continues and it's gotten more complex in the wake of israeli air strikes to keep damascus from shifting weapons to nearby lebanon. here to help explain recrenate vents is jon alterman the director of the mideast program at the center for strategic and international studies. sir, thank you for joining us. >> good to be with you. >> so let's start. in north africa we have recent events in tunisia and we have the french operations in mali which least initially appear successful and scattering the al-qaeda elements and separating them from the tuareg and insurgents. how's the united states need to deal with this in a broad way? does it need to be getting involved in both mali and more broadly in the region? what do we need to be doing? >> if you're talking about intervention mali it's a question of what you're tryin
the dozens of abandoned airplanes at the country's airport. >> the ruling party of tunisia has projected its own prime minister's decision to dissolve the government. there is a homecoming of shokri belaid's remains. they predict the dissolution of parliament announced by its own prime minister. the assassination has sparked mass protests in several major cities. now this report. >> the people here are pretty much aware of the implications of the assassination and the uncertainty that looms over the country. this is by the political establishment yesterday had a quick fix the problem. prime minister hamdi jebali said that he offered the technocratic government, refusing -- saying the offer to dissolve the government. the party says that it rejects a technocratic offer and they intend to stay in power. the other opposition parties want to include everyone in the talks and they don't want a democratic government. >> an inquiry by australia's top criminal investigation leaders has found widespread doping in professional sport. links to organized crime and the possibility of a match fixing. scan
>> more protester underway in tunisia -- protests are underway in tunisia. the other stories on al jazeera, as french forces in mali push north towards algeria, violence erupts in the capital. >> i am in brussels. after talks lasting through the night, we now have a draft proposal for the eu budget. many more hours ahead before a deal is finally done. >> nasa's curiosity rover gets down to work on the red planet. thousands of tunisians are gathering in their capital for the from -- funeral of a prominent opposition leader. shape -- shokri belaid was shot in front of his home. he was one of the government's fiercest critics. some are putting the blame on the ruling party. hashemi behar a -- hashem able horror -- haitian -- hashem ahelbarra is live with more. >> there are protests across the country and symbolic ceremonies paying tribute to the opposition leader. we are expecting the funeral to start anytime soon. the procession will be in the capital where he will be laid to rest. people are concerned about potential clashes with supporters of the government and supporters of the op
, for the last of those years, country director for morocco and tunisia. earlier in his career, did quite a bit of work which we will see john out, up in northern mali. very delighted to have him on our team at the africa center, as well as as a friend. also delighted to have another ,ld friend, dr. ricardo renÉ dr. of science at binghamton university on islam. he has been a colleague, i might mention that he and i are editing a book together on the north african revolutions. delighted to have him as a scholar of the region and a friend and our wives have become friends as well. it is in the family, so to speak. last but not least, this dr. is a political scientist and senior fellow at the middle east program of the carnegie endowment. and author of quite a number of works, some quite prescient in their timing on al qaeda. you have their biographical notes for fuller details. one thing not in the notes, i cannot resist mentioning that while there are few discussions of the crisis in mali going around washington, this will be the only one where the panel speakers includes individuals who have b
government in tunisia is expected to be formed in the next few days. that's despite the alliance falling apart. the country is facing a political crisis after the assassination of an opposition politician last week. even a new government may not be able to help unify the deep political divisions. >> it is the latest dispute among a coalition beset by division. the leader of the coalition is now distancing himself from the party. he accuses the group of sidelining its allies and the dominating the government. >> there were political conflicts. every party would like to get something for himself or herself or itself to the next elections. >> and other secular member of the ruling coalition threatened to pull out, earlier. they all disagree. ho-- all disagree about how to end this crisis and what's best for tunisia. but the opposition has a different view. the popular front, a gathering of leftist parties, accuses ennhada of hijacking the 2011 revolution. >> the parliament has failed to draft constitution and tackle our problems. we are in a delicate situation and therefore we need exceptio
schools to close and leaving hospitals working with emergency staff. tunisia is prime minister is stepping down after failing to form a new government -- tunisia's prime minister is stepping down after failing to form a new government. al jazeera is in tunis. >> prime minister hamadi jebali worked hard to form a government, but he failed to convince his own party and others to back his moves. so, he stepped down. however, jebali has left the door open for a future come back, saying that his -- he is ready to lead a national unity government, but only if his basic demands are met. >> the new government should have a clear program with a political ground that you devise -- that unifies all tunisians. what is important is to set a date for elections because forming a government is not the issue now. what is important is for our people and the outside world to have a clear vision as to when the constitution will be written and when elections will be held. >> the political crisis began on february 6, following the assassination of prominent opposition leader shokri belaid. the ruling and other
in federal prison. in tunisia, new protests broke out in the capital, demanding the end of the government. it was the second day of unrest sparked by the killing of a leading opposition figure. we have a report narrated by jonathan rugman of "independent television news." >> reporter: in tunis today, crowds converged on the interior ministry on the same spot where the so-called arab spring began two years ago. "the people want the downfall of the regime" the chant once again. but this time the tear gas came from police loyal not to a dictator but to tunisia's democratically elected government, one which now stands accuse of complicity in political assassination. the victim was chokri belaid, shot outside his home yesterday by a gunman on a motorbike. belaid had appeared on television the night before he died. the s.e.c. tar politician told his interview that tunisia's governing islamist party harbored religious factions which incited violence. his killing prompted the biggest explosion of anger since the revolution itself. groups claiming that revolution had been stolen by islamists who w
is on edge today. riot police in egypt and tunisia, bracing for more violence. protests have been happening there as you can see after friday prayers following the assassination after popular opposition leader in tunisia. remember, that was the birthplace of the arab spring two years ago. fox's's conor powell is live from jerusalem. conor, do we know why this tunisian opposition leader was murdered? >> reporter: he was an outspoken critic of the ruling muslim brotherhood party in tunisia. he was a leading figure in the arab spring revolution two years ago. on wednesday he was gunned down by an unknown assailant in front of his house. recently a muslim cleric in tunisia called for a -- his supporters turned out in thousands for his death. blamed the ruling muslim government for his death. although the tunisia prime minister denies it. he promised a full investigation and to catch those responsible for the murder. alisyn: do we have answer wlormt this assassination will spark more violence? >> reporter: we've already seen three days of violence and protest in tunisia and clashes with the poli
director in the office of the secretary of defense, and also country director for morocco and tunisia, and earlier in his career, did quite a bit of work, which i think you'll see brought out up 234 -- in northern mali including 30 trips in that region. ranging well, and delighted to have him on our team. another old friend, dr. ricardo, professor of political science and sociology and a corporation scholar on islam, ricardo, a good friend and colleague, and in the department of shameless self-promotion, i mentioned he and i are editing a book together in the north african revolution, but delighted to have him, and our wives have become friends as well. it's in the family so to speak. timely, last, but not least, dr. onwar, assistant professor of political science, and nonresident senior fellow at the carnegie endowment, and author of quite a number of works, some quite precious in their timing on al-qaeda in the islamic and its effects. you have their bigraphical notes for fuller details. i would note one thing not in the notes, and i can't resist mentioning that while there's few di
-maliki. in tunisia, huge crowds of mourners protested as opposition leader chokri belaid was laid to rest. he was assassinated earlier this week. tens of thousands converged on the cemetery, with belaid's coffin draped in a tunisian flag. violence erupted as police fired tear gas and demonstrators threw stones and set cars ablaze. thousands of demonstrators turned out in cairo and other cities across egypt, protesting president mohammed morsi and his islamist-led government. the crowds defied hard-line muslim clerics, who called on their supporters to kill opposition leaders. as night fell, security forces used tear gas to disperse protesters who threw rocks and fire bombs at the presidential palace. gunmen in nigeria have killed at least nine women working to immunize children against the polio virus. the attacks today were in kano, in the african nation's muslim north. the killers were believed to come from boko haram, a radical islamic sect. polio remains endemic in nigeria, but some muslim clerics have charged the vaccinations are a plot to sterilize young girls. the british government to
of americans will be watching to find out president obama's plan to create jobs. in tunisia, the ruling party says an agreement on a new national government is expected within days, following protests after the assassination of an outspoken opposition politician. anger against the government is not new. people in coastal areas of the country are accusing the lead of neglecting them. now this report. -- the elite of neglecting them. >> this has been a hotbed since long before the revolution. they have traditionally felt the capital. an the capit last week's assassination of shokri belaid ignited anger. >> the government has failed and lead the country down a dark tunnel. the solution is to inform a government of technocrats. >> the union has lots of support. towards the end of last year, it led protests which turned violent, succeeding in having a local governor replaced. many here blame the ruling party for failing to prevent the murder of shokri belaid. they already blamed the government for failing to bring investment and jobs, just like old times. so they set fire to the party's headquarte
to build a nuclear weapon. police and tunisia arrested a suspect linked to the murder of an opposition leader. he was shot in front of his home earlier this month. his killing sparked days of unrest and also led to the resignation of the prime minister. details of the arrest are still sketchy but the suspect is believed to be member of a hardline muslim movement. france says it will not negotiate with gunman who are holding a french family hostage and cameron. the group is threatening to kill the family unless the jail the fighters in cameroon and nigeria are freed. the kidnappers clinton departed the nigerian rubble group boko haram. it has become more dangerous for french citizens in certain parts of africa since france intervened in mali. >> it confirms the limitless cruelty of the hostage takers. it carried out the verification process which is necessary with the images. the only thing to be said is to reiterate how shocking images are, the cruelty by the kidnappers and the french government's determination to do everything possible to free them. >> less than a week ago now before
and operate. you have problems in mali, egypt libya, tunisia, all across north africa and -- >> rose: you do indeed. so therefore the idea of taking out in yemen an american citizen who had threatened america was justine th dick chey? >> yes. >> rose: by a drone attack. >> yes. he was clearly part of -- >> rose: should there will be checks and balances in terms of that? should there be some way -- >> take him to court? >> rose: i'm asking. >> i think when we hire the president of the united states he gets to live in the big house makes all that money, he's getting paid to make difficult, difficult decisions. >> rose: and this president has been prepared to step up and make those decisions? >> some of them he has. in other ways he is limiting the capacity of future presidtsto do it. every time you take down our military capabilities, every time you start laying up carriers instead of refueling them, every time you cut the defense budget with a meat ax, which is what he's doing, every time you do that, you're going to limit the capacity of the president ten, 15 years down the road to take acti
.s. consulates and embassies. da mass caucuses syria, kabul, afghanistan, tunisia, yemen, turkey. the one that is most important is benghazi, libya. go ahead. >> right. not and the fact that it was attacked and our ambassador was shuttered and three other americans but the fact that it happened with warning on september 11th. that is like being surprised when christmas falls on christmas day. we were completely flat footed. not expecting it. 8 attacks on american embassies with americans dead. that is an absolute abysmal failure of secretary clinton and you didn't mention in the list that could go on and on the fact that our relationship with our one democratic ally in the middle east israel is deteriorating. opinion about america in every country except japan has deteriorated since 2009. headed in the wrong direction. there was no reset with russia. in fact, it is worse than ever. >> mark, what will secretary clinton's legacy be? >> i think the personal legacy will be phenomenal. no national politician of either the republican or democratic party that enjoys over 70% national approval ra
travelled almost a million miles. including a visit to egypt and tunisia in 2011. the birthplace of the arab spring. she walked through tahrir square, the rallying point for egypt's pro-democracy movement. >> hi. hello. >> welcome, hellry. >> hi. nice to see you. >> thank you. thank you. hello. [ fishing rod casting line, marching band playing ] [ male announcer ] the rhythm of life. [ whistle blowing ] where do you hear that beat? campbell's healthy request soup lets you hear it... in your heart. [ basketball bouncing ] heart healthy. great taste. mmm... [ male announcer ] sounds good. it's amazing what soup can do. stay top of mind with customers? from deals that bring them in with an offer... to social media promotions that turn fans into customers... to events that engage and create buzz... to e-mails that keep loyal customers coming back, our easy-to-use tools will keep you in front of your customers. see what's right for you at constantcontact.com/try. five days later, i had a massive heart attack. bayer aspirin was the first thing the emts gave me. now, i'm on a bayer aspirin regimen.
. america finding itself on the sidelines. we are on the sidelines in egypt, tunisia, libya. we cannot pick who is going to be the winner. we can be there with help, with aid, should be there more. we could help with education and the things that america does best. to try and trick the metal is as if we can pick the winners and put them at the top, -- middle east as if we can pick the winners and put them at the top will be a disservice of america. we will not get the people we want on top. that is what we are seeing today. people that have not been close to america. they will find a way to build it that her society for themselves. america cannot choose george washington for somebody else. the syrians will have to find their own george washington. that will come out of this maelstrom of national revolution. they will find their leader that will lead them towards a better future and hopefully a democratic future. >> five sentences. >> i am not sure how to conclude. for the last 20 years, we have been not succeeding in warmaking or peacemaking in this region. the frame of reference is that --
as a difficult, the evolving situation in north africa, now with tunisia, with libya, with all these countries, and certainly with mali, and how you plan to direct the agency to deal with this devolving momentum that is taking place in northern africa. so that will be for tuesday, and at the request of senator levin, i ask for unanimous consent to add into the record a joint statement that he and i made on april 27, 2012, and, secondly, in order to have mr. brennan's answers to questions for the record by the time he returns before us in closed session, i ask members provide questions for the record by 5:00 p.m. tomorrow. that is friday, february 8, so we have them for you as soon as possible. i want to thank you and your family for being here and i wish you well. and you and the hearing is adjourned. >> thank you, chairwoman. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> on c-span today, "washington journal" is next live with your phone calls. later, live coverage of the farewell ceremony for out coming -- outgoing defense
... could've had a v8. >>> in tunisia right now, shock and angry protests after an outspoken opposition leader is gunned down. kate's here, she's got that and more of the top stories, kate? >> another story that's really troubling. a popular public figure and critic of tunisia's islamic-led government was according to an eyewitness, shot and killed as he left for work this morning. outraged protesters filled the streets and there were violent clashes with police. tunisia's prime minister condemned the assassination, saying the real target is, in his words, quote, the tunisian revolution as a whole. >>> also in germany, germany's education minister has been stripped of her ph.d in an embarrassing case of plagiarism, if you can even believe it, and she's the second minister in chancellor angela merkel's cabinet to face these allegations. the university awarded the minister the highest honors for her doctoral thesis, which one says has many plagiarized passages. >>> and just days after king richard iii's remains were identified underneath a parking lot in england, a battle is shaping up. w
democracies across the world from libya, tunisia, and beyond. it is in our mutual interest. i want to thank the president for the important leadership. showing the support for libya. i think he and the people of the united kingdom can be proud. william and i agreed that the syrian people deserve better than the horrific violence that threatens the everyday lives of innocent people, people wanting their government to be accountable and part of their own lives. the regime has rained down rockets, and that is just the latest example of brutality. we condemn this indiscriminate killing of innocent civilians and we condemn it in the strongest terms. it is just further evidence assad has to go. i think william for the effort to help dial up the pressure on the regime, for their contributions of humanitarian aid and hosting the transition conference last month. let me make clear that we will continue to work closely with british allies to address the growing humanitarian crisis and the support of the syrian opposition council. we are coordinating with the syrian opposition coalition, coordinating
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 70 (some duplicates have been removed)